Veronica polita, Veronica didyma, Pocilla polita, Grey field speedwell,
Hebrew: ורוניקה מבריקה, Arabic: لبخ أزرق

Scientific name:  Veronica polita Fr.
Scientific name:  Veronica didyma Ten. p.p., Pocilla polita (Fr.) Fourr.
Common name:  Grey field speedwell
Hebrew name:  ורוניקה מבריקה
Arabic name:  لبخ أزرق
Family:  Scrophulariaceae, לועניתיים

Information and Pictures of Israel Wildflowers
Location: Betah Mountain, Western Galilee

Life form:  Annual
Stems:  10-30 cm high, sparsely pubescent
Leaves:  Alternate, opposita
Flowers:  Blue, small, solitary, on axillary pedicels as long as the leaf
Fruits / pods:  Capsule reniform; seeds boat-shaped, elliptic
Flowering Period:  January, February, March, April
Habitat:  Batha, Phrygana, Disturbed habitats
Distribution:   The Mediterranean Woodlands and Shrublands, Semi-steppe shrublands, Shrub-steppes
Chorotype:  Oro Mediterranean
Summer shedding:  Ephemeral

Flowers in Israel (Israel Wildflowers and Nativeplants)


Derivation of the botanical name:
Veronica, named for the woman who took her veil, or a linen cloth, and wiped the sweat from the face of Jesus as he was bearing his cross to Calvary, and so named because the markings on some species supposedly resemble those on her sacred handkerchief.
polita, polio, to smoothen, polish; polished.
didyma, Greek, didymos, διδυμοϛ, double; two fruited.
Pocilla, small-cup, diminutive of poculum, a drinking-cup used in ancient Rome.
  • The standard author abbreviation Fr. is used to indicate Elias Magnus Fries (1794 – 1878), a Swedish mycologist and botanist; founder of modern fungal taxonomy.
  • The standard author abbreviation Ten. is used to indicate Michele Tenore (1780 – 1861), an Italian botanist.
  • The standard author abbreviation Fourr. is used to indicate Jules-Pierre Fourreau (1844 - 1871), a French botanist.

Veronica polita,Veronica didyma, Pocilla polita,Gray field speedwell, Twin Speedwell, ורוניקה מבריקה