Plants in Israel | Hemerocallis fulva

Martha's exotic Backyard in Israel

Hemerocallis fulva, Orange Daylily, Tawny Daylily,
Tiger Daylily, Ditch Lily, המרוקליס כתום

Scientific name:  Hemerocallis fulva (L.) L.
Synonym name:  Hemerocallis lilioasphodelus var. fulva
Common name:  Orange Daylily, Tawny Daylily, Tiger Daylily, Ditch Lily
Hebrew name:  המרוקליס כתום
Family:  Xanthorrhoeaceae,subfamily Hemerocallidaceae, משפ'השושניים

Hemerocallis fulva, Orange Daylily, Tawny Daylily, Tiger Daylily , Ditch Lily, המרוקליס כתום

Life form:  Herbaceous perennial, tuberous roots
Stems:  40–150 cm tall
Leaves:  Linear, 50-90 cm long
Inflorescence:  spikes of 10-20, each flower lasts only one day, opening in the morning and closing in the evening
Flowers:  5–12 cm across, 6 orange-red petals, with a pale central line; filaments 4--5 cm; anthers purplish black, 7--8 mm
Fruits / pods:  three-valved ellipsoid capsule 2–2.5 cm long and 1.2–1.5 cm broad which splits open at maturity to release the seeds
Flowering Period:   Early summer to late autumn
Habitat:   Forests, thickets, grasslands and stream-sides.
Chorotype:  Asia, from the Caucasus mountains and southeast Russia to the Himalaya and India, China, Taiwan, Japan and Korea

Hemerocallis fulva, Orange Daylily, Tawny Daylily, Tiger Daylily , Ditch Lily, המרוקליס כתום


Derivation of the botanical name:
Hemerocallis, Greek hemera, day; kallos, beauty.
fulva, tawny-orange.
  • The standard author abbreviation L. is used to indicate Carl Linnaeus (1707 – 1778), a Swedish botanist, physician, and zoologist, the father of modern taxonomy.

John Gerard (1545 – 1611/12), Gerard's Herbal: ‘These lilies do grow in my garden, as also in the gardens of Herbarists, and lovers of fine and rare plants; but not wild in England as in other countries.’
The artist Alexander Marshal (c. 1620-1682), a friend of the great gardener John Tradescant the Younger, produced an accurate painting of the ‘The day lillie’, a page of three flowering plants including: a Day Lilly, a yellow Toadflax and a sprig of Malva horaria (or Time-keeping Mallow).
John Parkinson (1567 - 1650), an English herbalist, botanist and apothecary to James I , in his book Paradisus in Sole (1629), described the species as ‘These flowers are almost as large as the flowers of the white Lilly, and made after the same fashion, but of a faire gold red, or Orange tawny colour.’

Hemerocallis fulva, Orange Daylily, Tawny Daylily, Tiger Daylily , Ditch Lily, המרוקליס כתום


Hemerocallis fulva, Orange Daylily, Tawny Daylily, Tiger Daylily , Ditch Lily, המרוקליס כתום
Alexander Marshal (c. 1620-1682), a page of three flowering plants including:
a Day Lilly, a yellow Toadflax and a sprig of Malva horaria (or Time-keeping Mallow),
Royal Collection © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II